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ASCM Supply Chain Certification  

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Gary Kerslake
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 7
April 6, 2020 11:06 am  

Is there value with this certification?


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Michael Murray
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Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 2
April 8, 2020 12:51 am  

Gary:  Not an easy question to answer as it depends on who is looking at you.

As far as the certification, the leanings along the way may be of value to you personally.  As someone who has done a tremendous amount of hiring, I have found myself always asking myself if I felt the candidate could do the job, regardless of what their certifications / degrees said.  I have found that a degree or certification does not, in my opinion, have a direct relationship with an ability to perform.  Some of my best managers and employees were people without any paperwork.  SO if you are looking at this purely from the standpoint of it helping you land a job, I would think carefully.  This is one mans opinion.

Experience and the ability to discuss real life supply chain issues will come through in any interview.


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Gary Kerslake
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 7
April 8, 2020 7:45 am  

@mikemurray2009hotmail-com

Hi Mike, Nice to meet you.  Thanks for your quick response.  I have mixed emotions on this one as well.  Two friends of mine, both are VP's of Supply Chain for large well known manufacturers here in Milwaukee value CSCP certification very highly.  As a matter of fact, one has said to me that he separates resumes based on APICS certifications.  In addition, I have been getting several inquiries from graduate students at Marquette and UWM about the CSCP certification program which, we are about to offer on-line.  They seem to feel that, based on a review of jobs available in supply chain, certification is a plus and, could separate them from their peers.  All that said, your comment "Experience and the ability to discuss real life supply chain issues will come through in any interview" is an excellent statement.  I myself started in a machine shop, no degree, journeyman machinist and shop foreman.  Did go on at night to get an associates degree and, involved with APICS here in Milwaukee in 1974.  My mentor, who hired me to work for CSC and IBM said that he was hiring me for my work ethic and, for what I could do.  Not for what I did not have.  Thanks again for your time and input.  Stay healthy.     


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Bruce Sing
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Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 2
April 8, 2020 7:51 am  

I agree with what Michael Murray responded in the Forum; I have always really looked at if the person could really do the job. Especially at the leadership level, I’ve run into a lot of really credentialed people that were awful leaders and didn’t really move the needle.

 

It also can depend on the role; technical accounting really requires a CPA and some engineering roles, especially in the Civil Engineering world, require a PE. But in automotive, at least when I was a Design Engineer, having a PE was a liability as I was legally responsible for product compliance if I signed off on a design as a PE. There wasn’t any career upside to that at the time (and I don’t think it’s any different now.)


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Gary Kerslake
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 7
April 8, 2020 7:54 am  

@brucesingpatinasolutions-com

Bruce - All great points from both you and Mike.  Thanks.


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Bruce Roles
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Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 3
April 8, 2020 8:03 am  

I have a little different twist on this question. I am considering whether to pursue getting the CPIM certification. My logic is I have some experience in the areas that certification covers but not real strong. I feel (my opinion) that I don't quite have what I should in order to pursue positions that Supply Chain centric. With that in mind, does it make sense to pursue this or should I just be pursuing these positions. There is nothing in my background that resume worthy that screams Supply Chain.


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Daren Samuels
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Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 1
April 8, 2020 8:21 am  

ASCM is a well-known organization and their training programs are recognized in the marketplace. The value depends on where you are in your career.  Early stage? Get all the credentials you can. Later stage (50+)? Add credentials for the joy of learning and to stay current.

In terms of working with Patina, we list certifications at the bottom of professional bios we present to clients. These certifications are ‘nice to have’ in our world. Our clients focus more on what professionals have accomplished in leadership and management over their long careers more than education and certifications.

I do believe that right now, with the economy stalled and “stay at home” orders issued across 42 states, learning skills and adding credentials can be a great use of your time. ASCM certifications are not going to make a huge difference if you are a ‘later-stage career’ professional, but you may find it very personally rewarding. That’s a good thing!


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Gary Kerslake
Patina Nation Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 7
April 8, 2020 8:46 am  

@brucer928gmail-com

Very interesting.  Since I am the lead instructor hear in Milwaukee for CSCP, I am bias towards it [Certified Supply Chain Professional] versus CPIM.  That said, I often get asked which certification should one go after...CPIM, CSCP or CLTD.  My recommendation is, if you are more closely aligned with Production Engineering, CPIM is great.  What's primarily inside the four walls.  If you are a Buyer dealing with the outside world, like China or Mexico, or IT systems support, Finance or Sales, CSCP is better because it covers both inside and outside the four walls.  CLTD is geared more toward logistics, warehousing and transportation.  Supply chain is truly where it is at today but, before committing to any certification, one must also ask, what do I really want for a career, not just today but, for the next several years.  Hope this helps.    


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Bruce Roles
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Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 3
April 8, 2020 9:03 am  

@grkerslakeaol-com

Gary - thanks for framing it up like you did. I am the production guy - been in charge of Manufacturing Operations. It seems from what I have learned and what you stated, that the CPIM is the certification I should pursue if I were to get a certification. With that said, opportunities I have come across would be at the Manager & Director level responsible for warehouse operations and some other related things. Having not directly led warehouse activities, but certainly engaged in them from a manufacturing perspective drives the question - is there value in getting it. Maybe there is not a good answer for that.


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Gary Kerslake
Patina Nation Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 7
April 8, 2020 9:18 am  

@brucer928gmail-com

Again, I am bias, but, I have been teaching CSCP certification classes for several years at both the local and national level and, I have had about every function and organizational levels from both large and small companies.  From Logistics Engineers to Sales to Warehouse management.  CI [Continuous Improvement] leaders as well.  The response that I get most often about the class is how all of the stakeholders are related.     


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